Fernsehturm Hannover by Heinrich Heidersberger

Fernsehturm Hannover

1958 / 2007 HHE03
Sizes:
39.4 x 28.2
Select finishing/framing:
Mounted under acrylic glass
depth 0.08" glossy, frameless, 39.4 x 28.2" (External dimensions) profile width: 0.59", with acrylic glass glossy, Canadian Maple, Brown, 41.1 x 30.0" (External dimensions) On premium paper (glossy) not mounted or framed. Shipped rolled.
depth 0.08" glossy, frameless, 39.4 x 28.2" (External dimensions)
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Plus tax and $ 39.90 in shipping.

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BACKGROUND INFORMATION
DRESS OF LIGHT

In the late 1940s, Heinrich Heidersberger shot his iconic nude series Kleid aus Licht (German for “Dress of Light”) for the magazine Stern, which Henri Nannen had recently founded. This series – which caused outrage in prim post-war Germany – is now viewed as one of the classics of photographic art.

The idea was as simple as it was spectacular: Using a projector he fashioned out of a cooking pot, he covered naked bodies with spots and stripes of light. In doing so, he combined nude photography and experimental photography in ways never seen before. Heidersberger’s “dresses” of light reveal, above all, the photographer’s passion for the phenomenon of light, a theme he explores further in his later work, Rhythmographien (“Rhythmographies”). Heidersberger came to photography by chance. In 1928 he moved to Paris to study painting with Fernand Léger. Walking through a flea market, he stumbled across an old wooden camera. It was, as he says, “a sign from fate”.

Marc Peschke

Heinrich Heidersberger , who died in 2006 at the age of 100, has his place among the most important German photographers of the second half of the 20th century. Seminal images in the fields of architecture and advertising mark his complex life’s work, and his name as an artist is of great repute as well. An exceptional photographer of the modernist aesthetic, Heinrich Heidersberger knew exactly how to combine the documentary approach of photography with modernist ideas. In his photographs he combines function and visual aesthetics, incorporating economic, technical, and social aspects into his perfectly balanced pictures. The aesthetic ideas of modernism were influenced by the notion of structure. Heidersberger’s photographs open our understanding of these structural laws in a surprising and creative way. In his photographs of post-war architecture of the fifties Heidersberger revealed the aesthetics of modernism, thus presenting them as an interplay of structure and form. Heidersberger’s images have retained their importance in photography, in spite of all of the visual styles and trends that have developed over the last decades.
VITA
1906Born in Ingolstadt, Germany
1928-1931Attended Fernand Léger’s art school while in Paris, began working in photography, met Piet Mondrian and Yves Tanguy
1946Began working as a photojournalist, advertising and architectural photographer in Berlin
1957Opened a studio in Brunswick, Germany, started working as a photojournalist for Stern
1961Moved to Wolfsburg, founded the artist’s group “Schloßstraße 8”
2006Passed away in Wolfsburg, Germany