German Vogue Collection

Cover, Pierre Mourgue IV

1929 / 2011
Limited Edition, Edition of: 100, Archive Stamp
Limited Edition, Edition of: 100, Archive Stamp
17.7 x 12.6
Bestseller
39.4 x 28.3
Change Frame
Frame

Photo mount frame Hamburg, profile width: 20 mm, Canadian Maple, Brown, 27.2 x 22.0" (External dimensions)

On premium paper. Not mounted or framed. Shipped rolled.

Change Frame
Frame

Mounted under acrylic glass, depth 2 mm glossy, Frameless, 39.4 x 28.3" (External dimensions)

On premium paper. Not mounted or framed. Shipped rolled.

$ 499.00
Plus tax and $ 34 in shipping. | Article No. VOG34
5336 Cover, Pierre Mourgue IV https://img-lumas-avensogmbh1.netdna-ssl.com/showimg_vog33_search.jpg 499 USD German Vogue Collection InStock /artists/vogue 1929 /artist/german_vogue_collection /search/category/menschen/catalog/topics/ /search/category/abstrakt_graphisch/catalog/topics/ /search/category/fashion/catalog/topics/ /search/category/interieurs/catalog/topics/ Lumas Fashion Art deco Twenties 20s Writing Letterings Lettering Cover pictures Cover picture Vogue Covers Cover Journals Journal Magazines Magazine Illustrations Illustration Graphic art Abstract graphic Design Woman Women Europe Germany Interior Interiors Telephone Telephones Dress Dresses Pattern Chair Chairs 2011-01-01
Background Information about German Vogue Collection
Introduction
German Vogue Collection

The early luck of legendary fashion magazine Vogue in Germany was short lived. From April 1928 to October 1929, up to three issues were published monthly. As fashion and aesthetic role models, the themes and dress codes perfectly fit to life on the boulevards of Berlin. The original title illustrations, from the likes of Pierre Mourgue, Georges Lepape, and Pierre Brissaud, celebrated a new self-aware type of woman in all her fashionable varieties and in the best graphical manner. The New York flapper with a bob cut, top hat, pearl necklace, boa, and extra-long cigarette holder was omnipresent. The cover sprayed elegance with a whiff of art deco. The use of reduced forms and the graphic image-style of Modernism were also highlighted. The individual game of combining typography and scenic presentation made each issue a unique piece of design. The issues became outstanding witnesses to their time. With the beginning of the world economic crisis, the era of the roaring twenties ended and German Vogue was shut down after only one and a half years, not to reappear on the market until many years later, in 1979. These outstanding early issues are all the more precious for it.

Stephan Reisner