Coloured Campbell's Soup Teal by Andy Warhol
Andy Warhol

Coloured Campbell's Soup Teal

2015 / 2017
Limited Edition, Edition of: 4000
31.5 x 7.9

LIMITED EDITION OF 4000
Screen-printed skateboard. Premium maple wood, made in Canada. A modern piece of wall art depicting some of the 20th century’s most classic artworks. 10% of proceeds go towards supporting the charity work of Skateistan.
Instruction & hangers are included.

31.5 x 7.9" (External dimensions)

$ 260.00
Subject to sales tax. Free Shipping | Article number: AWR08
13377 Coloured Campbell's Soup Teal https://img-lumas-avensogmbh1.netdna-ssl.com/showimg_awr08_search.jpg 260 USD Andy Warhol InStock /artists/selection /artist/andy_warhol-2 /artists/masters/ /search/category/menschen/catalog/topics/ /search/category/abstrakt_graphisch/catalog/topics/ /search/category/celebrity/catalog/topics/ /search/category/konzept_kreation/catalog/topics/ Lumas Andy Warhol The Skateroom Wall Object Wall Art skateboard Campbells Soup Campbells Soup Pop Art New York Tomato Soup The Factory Contemporary Art Abstract Expressionism Modern Art Teal blue Pop Culture modern United States 60s 70s Urban 2017-01-01
Background Information about Andy Warhol
Introduction
Andy Warhol
More than twenty years after his death, Andy Warhol remains one of the most influential figures in contemporary art and culture. Warhol’s life and work inspire creative thinkers worldwide thanks to his enduring imagery, his artfully cultivated celebrity, and the ongoing research of dedicated scholars. His impact as an artist is far deeper and greater than his one prescient observation that “everyone will be world-famous for fifteen minutes.” His omnivorous curiosity resulted in an enormous body of work that spanned every available medium and, most importantly, contributed to the collapse of boundaries between high and low culture.

Coloured Soup Cans
Andy Warhol’s 32 Colored Campbell's Soup Cans remain among the most iconic series in modern art. The project took differing forms over the years, culminating in a series of 19 different colors in 1965. Warhol began using spray paint to color the backgrounds and soup can labels. This process produced a body of work that distorted viewers' perceptions of familiarity.

Flowers
"The key motif in Warhol’s Flowers series was derived from a photograph the artist discovered in a magazine. Building on this, he rearranged and varied the number of flowers, running off numerous screenprints that differ in color and format. In this version, however, the flowers and green background were painted by hand.
"The subject of flowers illustrates Warhol’s serial principle perhaps more succinctly and yet more poetically than any other. By depicting flowers, the natural potential of plants to proliferate is combined with their technical reproducibility as decorative motifs for mass production. Although the fragile and ephemeral nature of flowers was transferred by Warhol to the realm of monumentality, an air of vulnerability and nostalgia also clings to his Flowers. In fact, his first flower pictures directly followed his Disaster series, in which he focused on media images revolving around death. Warhol’s Flowers can, therefore, also be seen in light of flowers as a symbol of fugacity and death.
– Dr. Raphael Bouvier, Curator at the Beyeler Foundation

The Skateroom
The Skateroom is a platform for promoting, selling, and producing art on skateboards in order to support youth-empowerment and development. Proceeds from this project will benefit Skateistan, an award-winning, international NGO with projects in Afghanistan, Cambodia, and South Africa. Skateistan is the first international development initiative to combine skateboarding with educational outcomes.