John Drysdale
Twilight Trio by John Drysdale
Twilight Trio
Twilight Trio
1956 / 2013

Twilight Trio

Classics
Photo Mount Frame - Canadian Maple Brown
12.6 x 14.2" (External dimensions)
Article number: JDY02

$ 129.00

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Sales tax not included | Additional shipping cost: $ 24

John Drysdale

Twilight Trio

Classics
1956 / 2013
Twilight Trio by John Drysdale
$ 129.00
5.9 x 7.9"

Photo mount frame Hamburg, profile width: 0.8"

Canadian Maple, Brown

$ 129.00
Share on
Sales tax not included | Additional shipping cost: $ 24

More works by John Drysdale

Background Information about John Drysdale

John Drysdale captures the carefree world of children

Whizzing through the streets of London in soapbox carts, throwing themselves into battle with dustbin-lid shields and homemade wooden swords, chasing a ball down cobblestone streets, or deep in concentration drawing chalk pictures on the pavement – John Drysdale’s black and white photographs delve into the vibrant, intimate world of children.

Born in Uganda, Drysdale grew up in a remote area. He became interested in photography at a young age, when he began experimenting with an old box camera. Shortly thereafter, he wanted to make his own prints. Unbeknownst to his father, he used a large water tank as a darkroom. It proved to be an ideal photo lab until the day his father tried to have it removed, shaking the young Drysdale, who was inside developing film.

While visiting relatives in England in the early fifties, Drysdale received an offer to study at the renowned Guildford College of Art. After studying for just two years his career began with a stroke of good fortune when he got the job of his dreams at the studios of London Vogue. At the time, Vogue was a leading style institution, attracting photographers such as Cecil Beaton, Norman Parkinson, and a number of famous Americans. Drysdale’s first assignment involved assisting Beaton, who had been commissioned to shoot the official pictures of the royal family in Buckingham Palace following the coronation of Queen Elisabeth in 1953. These images included the young, irrepressible Prince Charles and his spirited sister, Princess Anne.

Drysdale soon realised the joy he took from photographing children. Over the years, this passion led to a number of remarkable images. In order to capture children’s unpredictable behaviour on film, he often used multiple cameras, finishing the film in the first before quickly picking up the next to make sure he didn’t miss a single moment. Drysdale won awards for his photography at an early age, and has continued to do so throughout his career, including the British press “Pictures of the Year” award in 1955 for a reportage of children playing and the coveted “World Press Photo Award”.